Rotisserie Venison – the best tasting roast venison

Roasting venison isn't difficult - as long as you follow a few rules.
Roasting venison isn’t difficult – as long as you follow a few rules.

We’ve talked about roasting venison before – so you know it’s not my FAVORITE cooking method. The main reason why, is that I’ve never been a huge roast fan, whether it’s beef, pork, or venison. What I’ve come to realize over the years, is that a roast is less about the meat itself, and more about how you dress the finished product: au jus, gravy, horseradish, etc.

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How to Cook Venison Sous Vide for a Perfect Roast

You probably have everything you need at home to do simple sous vide – except maybe a cheap temperature controller. For less than $30, you can turn your crockpot into sous vide machine!

I hate cooking roast venison (or even beef for that matter). As a roast in the oven that is. I always overcook them. Or they end up as flavorless blobs of meat. I know, that’s why gravy was invented. It’s really a matter of more practice, but you know how it goes – if something doesn’t come easy, you resist it and fall back to what you KNOW will work (ie: can do easily and not have to actually LEARN). I’ve been hearing more and more about cooking using a method called “sous vide”. It seemed to be a promising way to consistently cook a steak or roast to the perfect temperature. Easily. SIGN. ME. UP.

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Venison Stock/Bone Broth with Vegetables

Making your own stock or broth from venison bones ensures that no part of your deer goes to waste - plus, once you've made it, you won't go back to store bought stock.
Making your own stock or broth from venison bones ensures that no part of your deer goes to waste – plus, once you’ve made it, you won’t go back to store bought stock.

I’ll admit, I get a little obsessive sometimes when it comes to fully utilizing my deer. I hate to see anything go to “waste”. I quote “waste” since technically my wild feathered and furred friends will get anything that I don’t personally use. But still, I get a little angst anytime some part doesn’t make it into my cooler for the trip home. When it comes to the bones, I at LEAST come home with all the leg bones and the ribs. The ribs we’ll cover another time, but the leg bones will be used to make make a hearty venison/vegetable stock that will then get used in many other recipes.

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How to clean deer liver for cooking or freezing

You want to remove as much blood from the liver as you can - it gives the liver a metallic taste.
You want to remove as much blood from the liver as you can – it gives the liver a metallic taste.

Venison liver is often one for the first meals prepped from the animal after a successful hunt. Personally, I’d go with the tenderloin first. Nothing wrong with starting with the liver, but I prefer to do a little prep on it before I use it, which will take a day or two.

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Homemade Deer Suet – Make deer fat into bird suet

Making suet is easy, and a great way to draw in and feed birds to your feeders through the winter.
Making suet is easy, and a great way to draw in and feed birds to your feeders through the winter.

Deer fat. It doesn’t taste particularly good. To us humans anyway. Yet some deer will have a lot. I’ve pulled almost 20 pounds of almost pure fat off a large deer that seemed to be bulking up for a rough winter.

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Chicken Fried Venison – How to chicken fry backstraps

Chicken frying venison is an easy and forgiving way to cook it. As long as you don't burn it, you can't mess it up!
Chicken frying venison is an easy and forgiving way to cook it. As long as you don’t burn it, you can’t mess it up!

I know, I had you at “chicken fried”.

Chicken fry anything, and what’s not to like? Chicken fry some venison loins, and you can convert anyone into a wild game eater.

This is a pretty easy recipe. And there are a few ways you can do it. You could fry these up in a pan, no problem (I like cast iron). I like the ease and consistency you get with a little countertop fryer. NOTE: don’t EVER use the fryer on the countertop, in the kitchen. Unless you really like the smell of fryer oil lingering in your house for a few weeks that is. A lesson I learned the hard way..

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Pickled Venison Heart

There are many ways to cook the heart. Pickling is an easy way to go, and it will let you enjoy it for more than just one meal.
There are many ways to cook the heart. Pickling is an easy way to go, and it will let you enjoy it for more than just one meal.

When field dressing a deer, you are going to need to make some important decisions: what parts to take, and what to leave behind. Hunters can debate for hours over what they think is worthwhile, but I think many will agree, you MUST take the heart and the liver. Here, we’ll focus on the heart.

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Venison Summer Sausage – Jalapeño and Cheddar, and Fat?

Venison Summer Sausage with a little beef fat added.
Venison Summer Sausage with a little beef fat added. Normally I don’t add fat to my summer sausage, but read the note at the end for a little twist on the recipe.

Fat. Venison doesn’t have much. That causes one of the main challenges to cooking it. Go too far and it will just be dry and tough.

Many times, cooks (or processors) will add fat to venison. Has anyone ever told you about their amazing backstrap recipe, where they wrapped everything in bacon? Well, I would argue that is more of an amazing bacon recipe, and the steak was probably overcooked. Same thing for sausages and hot dogs. I’ve heard people tell me time and again how great venison hot dogs are. What I don’t think they know is that their “venison” dog is probably at least 50% ground pork. Same goes for any venison sausage.

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Corned Venison Jerky

Corned Venison Jerky - You can dehydrate your venison after you corn it as an alternative for storing it. It will last a long time in the fridge, and comes in handy while cooking, or as a snack by itself.
Corned Venison Jerky – You can dehydrate your venison after you corn it as an alternative for storing it. It will last a long time in the fridge, and comes in handy while cooking, or as a snack by itself.

I have been a fan of corning venison for years. I love the flavor, and I love the options braising it and smoking it. Another reason to corn venison is if you have some gamey meat. If you shot a buck that had a little funk, there is no better way to remove gaminess. And believe me, I’ve tried pretty much every way imaginable.

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Venison Shank Stew with Parmesan Dumplings

Don't send your shanks to the grinder! A slow cooked stew with venison shanks will taste way better than any hamburger - and make fuller use of the shanks as well.
Don’t send your shanks to the grinder! A slow cooked stew with venison shanks will taste way better than any hamburger – and make fuller use of the shanks as well.

Some people may think I’m crazy. Heck, some people KNOW I’m crazy. But venison shanks are one of my favorite cuts of meat from my deer. There are basically three ways to process them:

  1. Get as much meat off of them as you can and put it in the grinder.
  2. Slow cook them whole.
  3. Slow cook them cut up into little disks.

Grinding them is a waste of time, unless you also grind all the tendons too. But who wants that in their burger or sausage? By the time you separate the meat out from everything else, you’ve lost a lot of time for a little meat.

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